09 Feb 2013

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We’ve started a new routine at Granger of designing stage sets that are intended to create a “wow” moment and live with those sets for 3 months.  Looking ahead at the fall we knew we had the Re-Innovate conference right around the corner so we decided to re-innovate the use of wooden palettes to create a dynamic backdrop for our set.

I knew that to really knock this project out of the park we were going to need 2 things.  1.  A lot of ingenuity (we’re not throwing lots of money at these projects) and 2. an incredible team of volunteers that could really make the idea come to life.  Turns out we had a great mix of both.

Our volunteer leadership team on this project not only had the skills to make something excellent, but they had an incredible sense of innovation along the way to keep the idea evolving into something really beautiful.

Here’s the team and how we did it.

Construction: We had a phenomenal crew of experienced craftsman that gave a lot of creativity and sweat to the project.

Jack Elston, Kraig Pehling, Nathan Roach, Jim McConnell, Matt Johnston, Dave Marzke, Jason Wilson, Chad Herman

Painting: We have some of the best painters I’ve ever seen.  Their work is really amazing.

Bev Hall, Mary Glaser

Lighting: The lighting on this project turned out incredibly dynamic.  Huge thanks to the lighting team for their hard work.

Austin Fox-Welter, Kevin Van Alstine, Trevor Warrell

The Design

For this set we wanted to create a unique (for us) platform look that would give symmetry to the stage.  We utilized some old platforms we had and built some new ones as well.  We already had 4-4’x8′ platforms so we built two more 4’x8′ and 2 4’x10′ for the drum platform.

platforms11

platforms2

The redemption of the palettes was a key part of the project for us, but using real, used, beat up palettes would have made for a lot more work so we built our own.  A “normal” palette is 4’x4′ so we used 1’x4′ wooden slats and drilled holes in them to hold the light sockets.  We stretched those slats across 3 2’x4’s and stapled them in to create the palette look.

palette-slats

palette-cutting

palette-unfinished

While this was going on we were prepping lights, cabling, and dmx to handle the bulbs we were installing in these palettes.

catwalk

When the construction was mostly done we were ready to paint.  We used a basic matte black on the platforms and a dark stain on the palettes to bring out the worn characteristics in the wood and create an antique industrial type look.

palette-lights-on

palette-stain

After the stain dried we installed bulbs and cabling for the lights.  We used 60w G25 globe bulbs on the palettes and hung more from the catwalk.

palette-lights2

palette-lights-on

Programming the lights came last.  Then we got the band on stage and finally had a finished product.  Let’s hope the shine doesn’t where off until after November.

finished-stage-1

finished-stage-21

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9 comments on “Stage Design Fall 2012
  1. arnezzy

    Awesome work guys, new setup looks great – I’ve always been a fan of the globe bulb lighting (from a non lighting/design perspective)!

  2. Bulb Boxes | Church Stage Design Ideas

    […] Check out the GCC Creative Blog for more details and pics. […]

  3. Joel

    Love the design! We’re working up something similar for Easter this year, and I had a question for you, did you ever have issues with Flares on camera? We did a test with a couple of bulbs on stage and saw small light flares when shooting directing towards the bulbs…just wondering if and how you dealt with it. Thanks! and again, love the design!

  4. gcccreativearts

    Hey Joel! We didn’t experience any lens flares. You can check out some video from our services on gccwired.com and see if we are shooting similar to how you are. Hope that’s helpful!

  5. Joey

    Were going to use this set for our 32 week “The Story” series. Had one question for you. What cyc or scrim did you use to be clear enough to get the most of the bulb but thick enough to get good projection? Awesome job

  6. Josh

    Awesome design! What type of sockets are those and where did you guys get them?

  7. Joel

    You guys are awesome for replying so quickly! I just had one more question tho, was there a reason that you went with the corded sockets as opposed to something cheaper like http://www.1000bulbs.com/product/58720/SOCK-901113.html that requires perhaps more wiring? Thanks again!

    • gcccreativearts

      We used the corded sockets because they have a piece on the front, sort of like a locking nut, that screws on and allowed us to attach them to the palletes easier. We unscrewed it, ran the socked through the pallete and then screwed it back on the other side. Definitely not the only way to do it.

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